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  • Trumpeter Yale Friend | Teen Jazz Artist

    When did you first begin seriously studying your instrument?

    Music has always been in my blood. My grandfather was a jazz saxophonist and my older cousin is a professional guitarist who studied music at NYU. I wanted to play music since I can remember. I started guitar lessons in 3rd grade, then trumpet lessons in 4th grade. In high school, I began seriously pursuing jazz trumpet.

    Trumpeter Yale Friend

    Located in Chevy Chase, MD

    • Trumpet
    • Years Playing: 10 years

     


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    Setup & Music Gear

    I play on a Cannonball 789-RL trumpet with a tuning slide custom built by Steve Loeb at L&L Music-Wind Shop. I use a Monette Resonance B2S3 mouthpiece.

    What are you doing with music right now?

    I currently play in four ensembles at Brown University. Most of my time is spent playing 2nd trumpet (the “jazz chair”) in the Big Band. We had a busy year, playing with Descemer Bueno, Ramon Diaz, and Pedrito Martinez in the fall, then with Jimmy Heath, and later Thomas Bergeron (the trumpet player) in the spring. In between we did a tour around Berlin.

    I also play in a jazz combo, the klezmer band, and a salsa band. In addition to regular performances, my combo hosts biweekly jazz jams.

    During the summer I teach jazz, trumpet, and ukulele at Buck’s Rock Performing and Creative Arts Camp. When I am home, I play bass and trumpet at my synagogue for select Shabbat services.

    Who are some of your influences?

    Without a doubt, Wynton Marsalis is my biggest musical influence. I pay careful attention to everything he does; the way he plays, the way he sounds, the way he interacts with his fellow musicians, the way he carries himself, and his passion for education. My other influences include Louis Armstrong, Clifford Brown, Lee Morgan, Hank Mobley, James Morrison, and Wynton Kelly among many others.

    Who do you/have you studied with?

    My first trumpet teacher was Sasha Soper. He taught the 4th grade band class and is actually a very talented jazz drummer with whom I’ve since performed. Following were Bill Turner, Kevin Collar, Lyle Link, Brad Clements. I currently study with Matt McGarrell, who directs the Big Band and teaches classes in jazz history and composition, and privately study jazz theory and performance with Ed Tomassi of Berklee.

    What are some of your goals musically for the future?

    I haven’t quite figured that out yet. In addition to music, I also study electrical engineering at Brown. My general plan is to play for as long as I can on top of another job, and to open the door if opportunity knocks.

    Any additional information you would like to add?

    Some other highlights of my musical experience are playing at Blues Alley in Washington D.C. four times, playing with Mike Stern, and more recently, rehearsing and performing with Roomful of Blues.


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    (A) You cannot submit one sentence answers to the Teen Jazz Artist Application form questions, they must be a short paragraph.

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    (C) Pictures and Contact Information on your page are optional, but let us at Teen Jazz know if you would like to have both or either on your profile.

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    June 17, 2016 • Interviews, Up and Coming Musicians • Views: 984

  • Joey Sommerville Overnight Sensation Review

    On October 28, 2014, trumpeter Joey Sommerville released Overnight Sensation, his fifth solo album on Jayvox.

    The album consists of nine originals amongst the ten tracks, and the trumpet player is heard sharing production duties with keyboardist, Jeff Lorber. Guests including Earl Klugh, Jeff Bradshaw, Elan Trotman, and Eric Essix make an appearance on the project, sharing their voices and playing on this unique project.

    The album opens with the title track, “Overnight Sensation,” a groove-driven and funky cut that draws you in. He then steps back and slows it down with “Desire” before changing things up again with the rock-inspired rendition of the classic Duke Ellington composition, “Caravan”, featuring Jeff Bradshaw on trombone.

    The standout song on the project is surely to become what it’s name implies. “The Next Big Thing” is a contemporary jazz and funk-infused track with Elan Trotman and Joey Sommerville sharing the melody with Jeff Lorber’s trademark groove and sound behind the wheel.

    Atlanta-based musician, Joey Sommerville, was a spotlight soloist on the Grammy-nominated and Juno Award-winning Cirque du Soleil album “Alegria.” He’s written and produced a Top 20 single for Bob Baldwin and an album by Rhonda Smith with performances from the likes of Prince, Sheila E. and Fred Hammond. When he isn’t performing as a jazz trumpet player, he can be heard doing voice spots for companies such as BMW, Coke and Ford.

    Get Overnight Sensation on Amazon.

    Title: Overnight Sensation
    Artist: Joey Sommerville
    Date: October 28, 2014
    Genre: Jazz
    Label: Jayvox

    Tracks:

    01 Overnight Sensation
    02 Desire (feat. Earl Klugh)
    03 Caravan (feat. Jeff Bradshaw)
    04 Red Cups Up
    05 I Just Wanna Be With You
    06 The Next Big Thing (feat. Elan Trotman)
    07 Rebecca of Birmingham (feat. Eric Essix)
    08 Karma
    09 Forever
    10 The Passport Life

    Get Overnight Sensation on Amazon.

    April 15, 2015 • Reviews • Views: 1002

  • Rick Braun Can You Feel It Review

    Can You Feel It is trumpet player Rick Braun’s 16th release as a solo artist and his return to the more jazz-funk that got him started with Beat Street in 1994.

    This latest effort from contemporary jazz veteran Rick Braun includes 11 tracks with 9 written or co-written by Braun and all of the classic energy that fans have come to know and love from him.

    The album moves from track to track with nonstop funky grooves and catchy horn section riffs. “Take Me to the River” is an excellent rendition of the Al Green tune with the talented vocals of Elliot Yamin. “Delta” is another fun, high-energy track, written by Braun and Jeff Lorber.

    Can You Feel It features the talents of Brian Culbertson, Phillippe Saisse, Nathaniel Kearney Jr, Rand Jacobs, Third Richardson, Nate Phillips, Euge Groove, Elliot Yamin, Dave Koz, Jeff Lorber, Richard Freemont, and Sergio Gonazalez.

    More about the artist:

    Rick Braun has a diverse and accomplished career as a performer across the jazz, pop, and rock genres. His accomplishments include everything from having co-written a Top 20 pop hit for REO Speedwagon (“Here with Me”), performing and touring with artists such as Rod Stewart, Sade, Tina Turner, Natalie Cole, Tom Petty, and War, and several #1 hits on the smooth jazz charts as a composer and as an artist.

    Get Can You Feel It on Amazon

    Title: Can You Feel It
    Artist: Rick Braun
    Date: July 08, 2014
    Genre: Smooth Jazz
    Label: Artistry Music

    Tracks:

    01 Can You Feel It
    02 Back to Back
    03 Take Me to the River
    04 Mallorca
    05 Get Up and Dance
    06 Another Kind of Blue
    07 Delta
    08 Silk
    09 Radar
    10 The Dream
    11 Dr Funkenstein

    Get Can You Feel It on Amazon

    October 1, 2014 • Reviews • Views: 1012

  • Trumpet Player Adam Hébert | Teen Jazz Artist

    Adam Hébert is a young jazz trumpet player from Montreal. Born and raised in a family of musicians he was introduced to music at a very young age. From that point on, music has always been his biggest passion. His love for jazz is ever increasing as well as his skill set and the complexity behind jazz has always permitted him to express himself in the most natural way. His biggest inspirations include many greats such as Chet Baker, Clifford Brown and Miles Davis. His sound concept and style are greatly influenced by those of Chet Baker. He prefers performing cool and modal jazz due to their freedom of interpretation.

    Trumpet Player Adam Hébert

    Located in Montreal, Canada

    • Trumpet
    • Playing for 3+ years

    Facebook | Soundcloud


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    Setup/Gear/Manufacturer of Instruments:

    I play on a 1953 medium bore Martin Committee and a drilled out Bach 5MV. For my flugelhorn I use a Conn Vintage One with a drilled Laskey 60F mouthpiece. Finally when I use a cornet I pay on my 80’s Getzen Deluxe with a Yamaha 13e4 mouthpiece.

    Why did you begin studying music?

    I started doing music at a very young age mostly because both of my parents are musicians. I started with violin and later switched to french horn. After a while I got bored with the classical frame so I switched to trumpet and a year later I dived in the wonderful world of Jazz!

    What are you doing with music right now?

    I am pushing myself the most I can, learning the fastest possible, gigging as much as I can and practicing the most I can to be always at the best of my capacities. I am presently studying at Vanier College in Montreal in Jazz interpretation.

    Who are some of your influences?

    My biggest influence will always be Chet Baker. Also there is Clifford Brown and Miles Davis.

    Who do you/have you studied with?

    I am presently studying with Jocelyn Couture at Vanier College and with Jan Jarczyk.

    What do you plan on doing with music in the future?

    I plan on continuig music and pushing my art to the highest level possible. Ideally I would like to have a career as a jazz soloist. Also, I would love to travel and have some kind of international career. I always aim to be at the top and maybe someday my dreams will come true!


     

    Interested in having your profile featured on our site?

    Teen Jazz is also looking for young Jazz Artist features, so you could become a feature if you apply. You will be notified by email of the status of your application.

    Terms and Conditions:

    (A) You cannot submit one sentence answers to the Teen Jazz Artist Application form questions, they must be a short paragraph.

    (B) You must respond to the confirmation email that you receive from Shannon Kennedy after you submit your profile or your profile will not be published on Teen Jazz.

    (C) Pictures and Contact Information on your page are optional, but let us at Teen Jazz know if you would like to have both or either on your profile.

    Apply Here

    March 12, 2014 • Up and Coming Musicians • Views: 920

  • Trumpet Player Benny Benack III | Teen Jazz Artist

    Setup/Gear/Manufacturer of Instruments:

    Trumpet: Bach Stradivarius 72H, 43 leadpipe, Large Bore
    Mouthpiece: Bach 3C
    Flugelhorn: Carolbrass Artist Endorser – CLF-6200-GSS
    Mouthpiece: Carolbrass custom leadpipe fit specifically for their 3C

    Trumpet Player Benny Benack III

    Located in Pittsburgh, PA, USA

    • Trumpet & Jazz Voice
    • Playing for 17 years

    www.bennybenackjazz.com/ | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube


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    Why did you begin studying music?

    I grew up in a musical household, with both parents being musicians. My mother is a vocalist and teaches in the Music Theatre department at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, while my father is a jazz saxophonist. I grew up listening to jazz as a child, and as the story goes my father used to stick the bell of his clarinet against my mother’s belly when I was in the womb and play – Let’s just say I was exposed to music at a VERY young age!

    What are you doing with music right now?

    I graduated from the Manhattan School of Music in May w/a full scholarship for Jazz Trumpet Performance. After a summer spent living in NYC hustling, gigging, networking, and building my career, I went straight back to MSM for my Master’s degree in Jazz, where I’m currently balancing my responsibilities there with an active performing and teaching career! I’m singing and playing around NYC more than ever, both as a leader and sideman. I’ve been fortunate to play and lead groups at some of the finest jazz clubs in the world, including Jazz @ Lincoln Center’s Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, the Blue Note, Small’s Jazz Club, Smoke Jazz Club, and many more. I’ve also been recording extensively, being featured as a trumpeter/scat vocalist on trombonist Mike Dease’s upcoming big band album, as well as playing trumpet and co-composing a tune for drummer Ulysses Owens Jr.’s upcoming album.

    Who are some of your influences?

    Trumpet-wise, the list is huge but I’ll try to condense: Clifford Brown, Nicholas Payton, Freddie Hubbard, Lee Morgan, Kenny Dorham, Woody Shaw, Sean Jones, Roy Hargrove, Wynton Marsalis, Miles Davis, Clark Terry, Donald Byrd, LOUIS ARMSTRONG, Roy Eldridge, Benny Benack Sr. (my grandfather was a dixieland/swing trumpeter!), and countless, countless others.

    Vocally, my influences are mixed, fusing many of the great jazz crooners with some of my other favorite voices regardless of genre:

    Frank Sinatra, Mel Tormé, Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis Jr., Dean Martin, Nat King Cole, Wayne Newton, Harry Connick Jr., Lou Rawls, Stevie Wonder, Johnny Hartman, Louis Armstrong, Chet Baker, Billy Eckstine, George Benson, James Moody, and many, many more.

    Who do you/have you studied with?

    A couple of great Pittsburgh trumpet players got me started, first I studied w/Joe Herndon for my formative years, and then with my high school band director, Frank Eisenreich (Pittsburgh Ballet trumpeter for many years). In high school I was connected with Sean Jones in Pittsburgh, and he became my teacher and mentor for about 4 years before I headed off to college. At the Manhattan School, I studied with the legendary Laurie Frink for my entire undergraduate degree (4 years) before her unexpected passing this summer. I’m currently studying with Scott Wendholt and Greg Gisbert, and have also had the occasional lesson with the likes of Marcus Printup, Terell Stafford, Jim Rotondi, and a few others.

    What do you plan on doing with music in the future?

    My goals in the near future are to be consistently working and performing as a leader and sideman not only in NYC, but touring and traveling worldwide as well. I hope to also be recording albums, and continuing to develop my teaching skills and network as well. I’m not sure which path will take the forefront at this point, but I’m going to continue singing, playing the history of jazz, as well as playing new music of mine and others. I love all different kinds of music, and don’t want to be exclusive to any sect if I can help it! Way down the road I would love to parlay a successful music career into acting, much in the way Harry Connick Jr. did. I acted some and performed in musicals as a kid, and would relish the opportunity to work those chops out again!


     

    Interested in having your profile featured on our site?

    Teen Jazz is also looking for young Jazz Artist features, so you could become a feature if you apply. You will be notified by email of the status of your application.

    Terms and Conditions:

    (A) You cannot submit one sentence answers to the Teen Jazz Artist Application form questions, they must be a short paragraph.

    (B) You must respond to the confirmation email that you receive from Shannon Kennedy after you submit your profile or your profile will not be published on Teen Jazz.

    (C) Pictures and Contact Information on your page are optional, but let us at Teen Jazz know if you would like to have both or either on your profile.

    Apply Here

    December 20, 2013 • Up and Coming Musicians • Views: 955

  • Review of BWB’s Album Human Nature

    Eleven years ago guitarist Norman Brown, saxophonist Kirk Whalum and trumpeter Rick Braun came together to create the album, Groovin’, and the “supergroup” BWB. The group has once again joined forces to release Human Nature, a tribute to the late King of Pop, Michael Jackson, on Heads Up International, a division of Concord Music Group.

    The album becomes available on June 18, 2013 and is supported with a tour around the country that extends into the end of the year (this is according to their calendar at the time of writing, the tour may go on longer). The musicians on the album in addition to Brown, Whalum and Braun include Sheléa on vocals, John Stoddart on keys, Braylon Lacey on bass, Khari Parker on drums, Lenny Castro on percussion, and Ralph Lofton on organ.

    Human Nature includes tracks that span from Jackson’s early days as part of the Jackson Five (Shake Your Body, I’ll Be There, Who’s Lovin You) to his prolific career as a solo artist (Human Nature, Beat It, She’s Out of My Life, The Way You Make Me Feel, I Can’t Help It, Billie Jean, Man in the Mirror, and Another Part of Me).

    The project was the brainchild of trumpeter Rick Braun, and the album Human Nature grew from there. It was merely a matter of picking songs from Jackson’s catalog, and with all his fantastic songs, it was certainly no easy feat. BWB, however, is not the first to pay tribute to the legendary Michael Jackson. “You take Miles Davis,” Whalum says, “for him to record a Michael Jackson song [like ‘Human Nature’] says something. It’s a validation. We’re not the first musicians to take a serious approach to Michael’s music. But for us it’s an honor because the feeling of the music communicates so beautifully. That’s ultimately what music is supposed to be about.”

    BWB’s versions of Michael Jackson’s songs each differ significantly from the original versions. The title track, “Human Nature,” is slower than the original and the arrangement is sparse in comparison while “Shake Your Body (Down to the Ground)” takes on a Latin Vibe. Rick Braun arranged “Beat It” with a reggae beat, Whalum and Stoddart changed the meter on “I Can’t Help It,” and “Who’s Lovin’ You” is adapted to a more bluesy feel.

    Human Nature is a diverse collection of Jackson’s music performed by three of the most popular artists on the contemporary jazz scene – Kirk Whalum, Rick Braun and Norman Brown.

    A little bit more about each of the artists:

    Saxophonist Kirk Whalum grew up in Memphis Tennessee where the local music scene played a big part in influencing his performance and style as an artist. He attended Texas Southern University in Houston where he began his career as a performer. Throughout his career he has had the opportunity to perform and record with artist such as Quincy Jones, Barbara Streisand, and Whitney Houston. He was awarded a Grammy in 2011 for “Best Gospel Song.” He has over twenty albums as a solo artist.

    Rick Braun hails from Allentown, Pennsylvania and is a graduate from the Eastman School of Music. He has a diverse musical background having performed with fusion group Auracle, written “Here With Me” for REO Speedwagon, and over 15 records as a solo artist in the jazz and smooth genres.

    Norman Brown was born in Louisiana but raised in Kansas City where he picked up the guitar at the age of 8. After high school, Brown moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in music. He released his first album in 1992 and then followed it with a gold-certified album in 1996. In 2002 he received a Grammy award for Best Pop Instrumental album for the album Just Chillin’.

    Get Human Nature on Amazon

    Title: Human Nature
    Artist: BWB feat. Rick Braun, Kirk Whalum and Norman Brown
    Date: June 18, 2013
    Genre: Smooth Jazz, Pop
    Label: Heads Up

    Tracks:

    01 Another Part of Me
    02 Billie Jean
    03 Human Nature
    04 Beat It
    05 Who’s Lovin’ You
    06 She’s Out of My Life
    07 Shake Your Body (Down to the Ground)
    08 The Way You Make Me Feel
    09 I Can’t Help It
    10 I’ll Be There
    11 Man in the Mirror

    Get Human Nature on Amazon

    June 21, 2013 • Reviews • Views: 1259

  • Trumpet Player Dizzy Gillespie Biography | Teen Jazz Legend

    John Birks Gillespie, later known as Dizzy, was born in 1917 to James and Lottie Gillespie. He was the youngest of nine children. His father, James, was a local bandleader, and so, instruments and music were always available to young Dizzy at an early age.

    Dizzy Gillespie first began music by studying piano. He later taught himself the trombone, and then, at the age of 12 he switched to the trumpet. It was with this instrument that he would go on to not only be one of the leading figures in bebop, but in Latin and Afro-Cuban jazz. But it wasn’t only as a musician that he became notable. In addition to his playing, he is well known for his unique embouchure, style of dress, bent trumpet, and scatting.

    In 1935 Dizzy earned his first professional gig with the Frank Fairfax Orchestra. He later became a member of Teddy Hill’s orchestra where one of his greatest influences was a former member (Roy Eldridge). After touring and recording with Hill, Gillespie joined Cab Calloway’s orchestra where he began to establish a name for himself as a performer. Due to growing distaste with Gillespie’s solo style and an incident involving a spitball (which was reportedly not thrown by the accused), Dizzy was fired.

    Gillespie then moved through a number of bands including that of Ella Fitzgerald, Coleman Hawkins, et al. He also wrote arrangements for groups belonging to Jimmy Dorsey and Woody Herman. In 1942 he joined Earl Hines’ band where Charlie Parker was also a member. It was during this time that he wrote “A Night in Tunisia.” When Billy Eckstine, the vocalist in Hines’ group, left the band, Bird and Dizzy followed. In 1945 Gillespie and Parker recorded songs including “Salt Peanuts,” “Hot House,” and “Groovin’ High.” The two eventually parted ways, but until Parker’s death, they occasionally reunited for performances.

    Dizzy also toured as part of Jazz at the Philharmonic and led various combos that featured performers such as John Coltrane and Milt Jackson. In 1956 he formed a big band and began touring outside of the US. Members of this group included Benny Golson, Wynton Kelly, and Lee Morgan.

    In the 1970s Gillespie toured as a part of the Giants of Jazz, but his trumpet playing began to deteriorate. He remained active, albeit inconsistently until 1992. He passed away due to pancreatic cancer in 1993 at the age of 75.

    April 26, 2013 • Interviews • Views: 1723

  • Trumpet Player Miles Davis | Teen Jazz Legend

    Miles Davis is arguably one of the most influential trumpet players and band leaders in American history (Louis Armstrong is another) with a career that spanned 50 years. He was not only a multi-platinum artist, but he was also an inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (2006). His album Kind Of Blue, is considered a “national treasure” and received its fourth platinum certification in 2008 for over four million sales in the US alone.

    Trumpet Player Miles Davis (né Miles Dewey Davis III) was born in Illinois on May 26, 1926 to dental surgeon, Dr. Miles Dewey Davis, Jr., and music teacher, Cleota Mae Davis. At the age of 12 he began taking trumpet lessons and by the age of 16 he was playing professional gigs.

    Davis got his start playing with Eddie Randle’s Blue Devils, a band based in St. Louis. He also had the opportunity to play as a part of Billy Eckstine’s band while they were in the same area due to the fact that his regular trumpeter was out sick. As part of this opportunity, Miles played with Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker.

    Later that year (1944), he began studying at Julliard (then known as the Institute of Musical Arts in New York City) and performing with Parker in local clubs. After only a year in school, he abandoned his education for a full-time career in music, and joined Benny Carter’s band. It was with this group that he played on his first recordings as a sideman.

    In 1949, Miles Davis earned a contract with Capitol Records which resulted in 12 tracks he recorded with Kai Winding, Lee Konitz, Gerry Mulligan, JJ Johnson, John Lewis and Kenny Clarke. This 12 tracks were eventually released by Capitol as the LP Birth of the Cool.

    Miles Davis signed with Prestige in the early 1950s and released several albums with performers such as Sonny Rollins and Art Blakey.

    In 1959, Davis released Kind Of Blue, and the album went on to sell several million copies not only making it a great success, but arguably his most popular album.

    During the 60s, Davis continued to record and collaborate with artists such as Hank Mobley, Coltrane, Gil Evans, Herbie Hancock, et al. Bitches Brew was released in 1970, signifying Davis’ turn to a more electrified and jazz-rock style. The album reached the pop Top 40s and was his first certified gold album.

    He continued to record and perform into the 70s and 80s (with the exception of a five year break due to illness). He passed away in 1991 due to a combination of pneumonia, a stroke and respiratory failure all occurring within a few months.

    Throughout his career, Miles Davis recorded and released more than 50 albums, earned the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award and countless Grammy awards for Best Jazz Composition, Best Jazz Performance, Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Best R&B Performance and Best Large Jazz Ensemble Performance. He inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006 and he received an honorary Doctorate in Music from the New England Conservatory as well as countless other awards.

     

    April 26, 2013 • Interviews • Views: 2303

  • Lane Stowe “Have Groove Will Travel” Review

    This article is a guest post by Joel Perkosky.

    Many jazzers complain today that they cannot bring jazz into the modern music scene. While this might be true, there are numerous artists making jazz into a more ‘desirable’ art form for the new generation. One of these artists, in my humble opinion, is a man named Lane Stowe. With the debut of his first CD, ‘Have Groove Will Travel’, Lane is setting a high mark for what is to come with the innovation of modern jazz and how the modern generation fits to it.

    “Have Groove Will Travel”, according to Lane himself, is “a ‘groovalicious’ vocal mix of smooth R&B, jazz, doo-wop, rock, samba and traditional songs”. This couldn’t be more true. When not mellowing out the most stressed-out listener with the smooth, mellow tones of traditional jazz, he is energizing the most distressed person with up-beat, hip-hop charts. Aside from that, there are very soulful songs; like “Amazing Grace” and “The Star Spangled Banner” to stir something within your spirit and make you appreciate music that much more.

    The CD itself was done very professionally; using all pro or semi-pro musicians to record the CD, using a professional studio based out of Lancaster, Pennsylvania and having the photography and liner notes done through a company based in Sanatoga, Pennsylvania. Using a variety of musicians including my own band director, this CD is a top notch product to show the true talent behind Lane Stowe. Lane by trade is a vocalist but he can also play multiple instruments including trombone, flugelhorn, trumpet, and euphonium. Lane also plays a mean bass, having been influenced by Jaco Pastorious and one of his college friends we know as Johnathan Sanborn (son of famous David Sanborn). The CD was cut very cleanly and mixed evenly. No skips, bad takes, errors to my ear, or mistakes with pitch or rhythm. A very fine product indeed.

    I encourage you, as a musician or a non-musician, to pick up this CD. Your day will become that much better when the musical genius of Lane Stowe starts flowing through your spirit.

    Buy the CD:

    Have Groove Will Travel


    joel-perkoskyJoel Perkosky

    Graduate of Mansfield University 2012 – BA. Music.

    January 4, 2013 • Reviews • Views: 956

  • Review of Lin Rountree’s Performance at Spaghettini’s Sep 2, 2012

    This past weekend has been a whirlwind of music events, and I had the pleasure of seeing and sitting in with several great artists. The first event was a performance by Incendio where I had the chance to sit in on a few songs, you can read the review on Teen Jazz. Lin Rountree’s performance with U-Nam was the following night, and although vastly different from the music of Incendio, it was just as exciting.

    Lin Rountree is an accomplished trumpet player who performs in the smooth jazz and soul/R&B styles. He began playing the trumpet at the age of 11 and since has led a successful career with four solo projects. He endorses Wisemann trumpets and flugel horns.

    The concert featured the music of Lin Rountree and U-Nam, the two main artists, and consisted of two sets. The band was outstanding, the artists had the audience on their feet and even those on the other side of the restaurant snuck into the bar to see what all the excitement was about. It was a fantastic performance and it was amazing to see these two great artists perform together.

    November 13, 2012 • Reviews • Views: 1072