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  • Review of Kyle Eastwood’s Album The View from Here

    Kyle Eastwood’s latest album, The View from Here, was released March 12, 2013 on Jazz Village. The album showcases Kyle Eastwood’s growth and evolution as an artist with eleven unique tracks written by Eastwood and the members of his ensemble. The View from Here was recorded in France near Avignon at La Buissonne.

    With The View from Here, Eastwood shares his rich musical background with listeners and gives them an inside view into his life as both a fan of music and an artist. Alongside Eastwood on double and electric bass are Graeme Blevins on soprano and tenor saxophones, Graeme Flowers on trumpet and flugelhorn (*note: may actually be Quentin Collins, the trumpet player is listed as different performers on different sources), Andrew McCorkmack on piano and keys, and Martyn Kaine on drums.

    Nine of the 11 songs on the album were written solely by Eastwood while “Mistral” is written by trumpeter Graeme Flowers and “Luxor” is by Eastwood and pianist Andrew McCormack.

    Kyle Eastwood is the son of the famous Clint Eastwood, but is respected in his own right as a jazz performer, band leader and composer. His music had appeared in films such as Mystic River, Million Dollar Baby, and Gran Torino. He began studying the bass in high school and later studied with Bunny Brunel. He released his first album From There to Here in 1998.

    Get The View From Here on Amazon

    Title: The View from Here
    Artist: Kyle Eastwood
    Date: March 12, 2013
    Genre: Jazz
    Label: Jazz Village

    Tracks:

    01 From Rio to Havana
    02 For M.E.
    03 The View from Here
    04 Sirocco
    05 Luxor
    06 Une Nuit au Sénégal
    07 The Way Home
    08 The Promise
    09 Mistral
    10 Summer Gone
    11 Route de La Buissonne

    Get The View From Here on Amazon

    June 3, 2013 • Reviews • Views: 1108

  • Bassist Gene Alestock | Teen Jazz Artist

    Setup/Gear/Manufacturer of Instruments:

    Ibanez SDGR Bass
    Kustom Amp for performence. Line 6 for practice and smaller gigs
    Kay/Engelhardt Kay C-1 Upright bass.

    Why did you begin studying music?

    I began studying for the simple fact that it intrigued me. I had the equipment and one day I saw a Jimi Hendrix video and I went from there. I bugged my mom for lessons on bass then quit that. Trumpet was my first instrument but bass is my passion.

    Bassist Gene Alestock

    Located in Hyattsville, MD

    • Primary Instrument: Bass
    • Doubles: Trumpet
    • Playing for 7 years

    Teen Jazz Artist Badge

    [What’s this?]

    What are you doing with music right now?

    Currently a Junior in High School, looking for more gigs to play, studying and perfecting my art.

    Who are some of your influences?

    McBride, Spalding, Jamerson, Kevin Walker, Wooten, Jackson, Many local bassists. Etc.

    Who do you/have you studied with?

    Chris Vadala, Anthony Townes, Steven Roy, Mrs. Kim etc.

    What do you plan on doing with music in the future?

    I plan on being a successful performer and a part time clinician and private instructor.

    Anything else you would like to add?

    If you need a bassist in MD I’m right here. Hit me up (301-536-0625).


     

    Interested in having your profile featured on our site?

    Teen Jazz is also looking for young Jazz Artist features, so you could become a feature if you apply. You will be notified by email of the status of your application.

    Terms and Conditions:

    (A) You cannot submit one sentence answers to the Teen Jazz Artist Application form questions, they must be a short paragraph.

    (B) You must respond to the confirmation email that you receive from Shannon Kennedy after you submit your profile or your profile will not be published on Teen Jazz.

    (C) Pictures and Contact Information on your page are optional, but let us at Teen Jazz know if you would like to have both or either on your profile.

    Apply Here

    March 15, 2013 • Up and Coming Musicians • Views: 1042

  • Bassist Sam Solomon | Teen Jazz Artist

    Setup/Gear/Manufacturer of Instruments

    Ibanez SDGR Bass
    Squier Vintage Modified Jazz Bass, with EMG JHZ passive pickups, Leo Quan Badass Bass Bridge IV, and DR Lo-Rider strings. Behringer UltraBass BX1200 amp.

    Why did you begin studying music?

    I began studying music because of my love for it. The sound a bass makes when provided the right groove is sweet sugar to my ears. I wanted to participate in the stuff I love listening to. I wanted to make a contribution to the world of music.

    Bassist Sam Solomon

    Located in Cherry Hill, NJ

    • Age: 16
    • Primary Instrument: Bass
    • Playing for: 5 years

    Teen Jazz Artist Badge

    [What’s this?]

    What are you doing with music right now?

    I am playing in the Cherry Hill West High School Jazz Ensemble, and jamming with friends. I played a show with 3 friends this past summer, and it was a blast.

    Who are some of your influences?

    Anthony Jackson, Jaco Pastorius, John Coltrane, Michael Peter Balzary, Victor Wooten, Stanley Clarke, Marcus Miller, Charles Mingus, George Benson, just to name a few.

    Who do you/have you studied with?

    My mentor Antonio Gandia. He’s taught me all 5 years of my bass playing era. I’ve also studied with Matt Cappy, a jazz trumpeter who has played with bands such as Jill Scott, Jay-Z, Mary J. Blige, and The Roots.

    What do you plan on doing with music in the future?

    I plan on gigging jazz venues and small shows.

    Anything else you would like to add?

    Contact me if you’d like to jam at 856-701-2645.


     

    Interested in having your profile featured on our site?

    Teen Jazz is also looking for young Jazz Artist features, so you could become a feature if you apply. You will be notified by email of the status of your application.

    Terms and Conditions:

    (A) You cannot submit one sentence answers to the Teen Jazz Artist Application form questions, they must be a short paragraph.

    (B) You must respond to the confirmation email that you receive from Shannon Kennedy after you submit your profile or your profile will not be published on Teen Jazz.

    (C) Pictures and Contact Information on your page are optional, but let us at Teen Jazz know if you would like to have both or either on your profile.

    Apply Here

    March 3, 2013 • Up and Coming Musicians • Views: 1082

  • Bassist Andrew Tegeler | Teen Jazz Artist

    Setup/Gear/Manufacturer of Instruments:

    Fender Jazz Bass, Ampeg BA300 210 combo amp

    Why did you begin studying music?

    I began studying music in seventh grade. I have continued to take private lessons since then.

    What are you doing with music right now?

    Right now I am in two rock bands in Massachusetts: “Sound Pilot” and “Pacifists at War”. I am also taking private lessons where I am learning jazz bass. I am also going to attend the Berklee College of Music 5-week jazz program this summer.

    Bassist Andrew Tegeler

    Located in Needham, MA

    • Primary Instrument: Bass
    • Playing for 5 years (age 16)

    Teen Jazz Artist Badge

    [What’s this?]

    Who are some of your influences?

    I am influenced by rock bassists such as Flea and Sting. I especially like Flea’s use of slap bass. John Coltrane is also a major influence on my playing style.

    Who do you/have you studied with?

    I am currently studying bass in private lessons under Sven Larson in Needham.

    What do you plan on doing with music in the future?

    In the future I plan on advancing forward with my bands as well and with jazz ensembles. I am going to the Berklee 5-week summer program this year to study jazz.


     

    Interested in having your profile featured on our site?

    Teen Jazz is also looking for young Jazz Artist features, so you could become a feature if you apply. You will be notified by email of the status of your application.

    Terms and Conditions:

    (A) You cannot submit one sentence answers to the Teen Jazz Artist Application form questions, they must be a short paragraph.

    (B) You must respond to the confirmation email that you receive from Shannon Kennedy after you submit your profile or your profile will not be published on Teen Jazz.

    (C) Pictures and Contact Information on your page are optional, but let us at Teen Jazz know if you would like to have both or either on your profile.

    Apply Here

    February 27, 2013 • Up and Coming Musicians • Views: 1227

  • Review of Darryl Williams at Spaghettini’s Dec 2012

    This last Sunday was one of several opportunities that I have had to see bass player Darryl Williams perform with his band and he never fails to impress audiences with his energetic music and talented group. The line up this past weekend included U-Nam on guitar, Tony Moore on drums, Jason Weber on sax, Greg Manning on keys and of course Darryl Williams on bass. During the second set, keyboardist Jonathan Fritzen made a special guest appearance as well as a fantastic guest vocalist whose name, unfortunately, I did not catch.

    Several highlights from the show included a solo by guitarist U-Nam that had the audience on their feet, saxophonist Jason Weber’s use of effects on the saxophone (like wah and a doubler) and the guest performances by Fritzen.

    You can check out Darryl William’s web site to find out when he will be performing near you. He hosts a several jam sessions in Temecula and San Diego that you really should attend if you’re in the area! He has special guests each and every week. You never know who’ll show up!

    January 8, 2013 • Reviews • Views: 1225

  • Bassist Carol Kaye | Teen Jazz Influence Interview

    A LITTLE BIT ABOUT CAROL KAYE:

    Carol Kaye has been playing bass since 1963, but started out as a jazz guitar player in 1949. Her career commenced with her playing in all the jazz clubs in the late 1950s and she started doing studio work on guitar in 1957. She first became a recording bass player when one recording session, the bass player didn’t show up and she was handed a bass to fill in for him. Carol Kaye has done over 10,000 record dates which is over 44,000 songs. She has played on movie scores such as M.A.S.H., Mission Impossible, Adams Family, 1st Bill Cosby, Hawaii 5-O, Wonder Woman, Thomas Crown Affair, Airport and the Brady Bunch. She has played with musicians including Beach Boys, Ray Charles, The Righteous Bros., Johnny Mathis, Nancy Sinatra, Henry Mancini, Monkees, Sonny & Cher, Quincy Jones, Ike & Tina Turner, Mel Torme, Bobby Darin, Frank Zappa, and Wayne Newton.

    THE INTERVIEW

    HER ADVICE FOR THE FEMALE MUSICIAN:

    The most important thing as a female musician is to have a good attorney – not an entertainment lawyer. You need to have a good regular attorney because you don’t want any kind of deals made that you don’t know about. “It’s a fallacy that you have to have an Entertainment Lawyer… no-way, and in fact I’ve seen them make secret deals with each other just have a ‘good lawyer period’ or one who’s not in with the rest of them. If it’s an Entertainment Lawyer, so many lawyers would make deals just to further their own careers and won’t handle things right for their upcoming clients but be more in favor for the company instead. I’ve seen it happen.”

    “Unless you’re a huge big star, you’re always in some danger of deals being made without your knowledge and probably not for your own best interests but for the good of the attorneys. With big stardom, you command more power and more loyalty but even then, I’d be careful and always watch them. I know a few attorneys who are excellent but also many who are just terrible yet have the smooth charm and they can fool you — so you just need to find the right one as you climb the ladder of success.”

    The thing about the music industry is that you have to do it well, and you can’t fall in love with the idea of being a star. “As a musician, you have to get your craft together and don’t believe all the compliments you receive – take everything with a grain of salt. There are a lot of good people in the business, but at the same time, if you are trying to make it in the business, there are some bad people who you really shouldn’t be around.”

    As a musician, Carol Kaye had found it tough to make a living… but she’d always had respect and that was the “easy part”. “I’ve always had it very tough from the get go, with my poor days (I was struggling big time until I was about 28-29 years old and then it was better, but I worked day and night since I was 9 years old, that’s NOT easy at all).” Her career was very easy in the sense that she was well-respected by all musicians, but had a tough life supporting herself and her family, having children beginning at age 16, and responsibilities she always managed to take care of.

    “Today there seems to be so much pornography, ads showing women’s bodies, and so much accent on sexual stuff, that I believe it’s tougher for women to get the respect they deserve when they’re professional musicians. And I believe the men respected the women in the music business a lot more in general in the jazz world of the 40s and 50s than they do in the general music world of today. The jazz world I think is better for women overall when you compare styles of music.”

    “Don’t use drugs, don’t drink and keep in touch with real friends and family. It is tougher today to make it as a female musician even though there is more opportunity.”

    Carol Kaye began working at the age of nine. After taking lessons for 3 months, she began her professional guitar career at the age of 14 and discovered that music was a good way to earn money to pay for food and other essentials in life. Music taught her the importance of being good at what you do. “I feel there is way too much emphasis on sex, image, beauty and having to look ‘sexy’ to sell yourself these days. Also, all I see on-stage sometimes are singers standing up, singing and pretending emotions… It’s much better to sing with your honest emotions than to pretend emotions and to ‘put on a show’ – that’s very facetious and phony; yet the public sometimes does respond to some of the energy of phoniness these days… I still think it should be more honest on-stage.”

    Another piece of advice Carol Kaye has is to keep as much control over your product (your music). She suggests you start your own publishing company in your own name so you don’t have to get a special bank account. “If you publish your own songs and copyright them, youcan wrangle a better deal for yourself with companies, and keep some of the publishing rights. Ownership of your tunes guarantees you royalty monies and power for a better contract more in your favor with companies.”

    DATING IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY:

    Her first piece of advice, she found rather humorous. “Stay away from drummers – they are kind of wicked.” Although she says there are nice drummers, she has found them more likely to be trouble. 😉

    “Don’t date someone you are close with and work with, half the time it doesn’t work out and it momentarily wrecks your career. The man gets off scotch free, but women take more time to get over it. The best way to get over a relationship is to get mad. If you are angry enough, then you can perform even better.” Carol warns that you have to be careful with relationships and “that it has to be the right combination”.

    MAINTAINING YOUR IDENTITY:

    At first she found difficulty staying true to herself in her success. She knew that she had a lot of power. “The power comes from when you realize that because of you, artists have hits – you get a big head. You have to be careful not to let success turn your head. Make sure you keep your life centered well by having a good hobby or two away from the music business… it’s important to keep humble, and not believe all the praise.”

    Carol Kaye has never had problems with competing with men. She was never mean, but let them know that she wouldn’t go for any foolishness. When you work with men in the music business, especially in studio work, it’s a very important business and everyone is super professional. Women are treated very well in the studio work.” She was also respected because she was better on her instrument than most men. “Don’t take your identity from men – don’t let them tell you how to be a girl.”

    “There are a few lowlifes around, just ignore them, stay away from them. Sometimes feeding back to them word for word any insults they give to you, ‘you mean blah blah blah?’. Sometimes that stops them from tangling with you to argue….put it ALL on “them” – you don’t have to defend yourself to a low-life at all, they’re not worth the dust on your shoes. Really great professionals act like professionals.”

    BEING LEFT OUT AS A FEMALE MUSICIAN:

    There was one time where this one guy did a lot of record dates and everyone hired her except this guy because she was a woman. He was from the south and so he didn’t have a lot of confidence in her playing because of her gender. Then at one point he had to hire her, and realized that she was a regular person, but it was for about a year that he didn’t want to hire her.

    SIGNIFICANCE OF IMAGE AS A PERFORMING ARTIST:

    “Image to the artist is very important. Image to the musician is not important. When you play your music – it speaks. If you are a star – you have to craft your image. You have to sit and think about who you want the public to think you are.Music is a business. If you are an artist – you are the product, you have to look at yourself how an audience sees you and figure out how to improve.”

    “Play your instrument, but don’t think of yourself as a woman. Think of yourself as a musician – don’t put woman first in your mind. Music doesn’t have a gender- guys don’t think of themselves as a male musician. If someone brings it up, don’t give it any attention. But if someone is really giving you a hard time, repeat back to him what he is saying. Twist it around so the rest of the people in the room will laugh at him and the will stop. If someone is giving you a hard time, depending on what type of person it is determines how you deal with it. You always have to act like a professional.”

    “Practice – really practice – practice makes perfect. You have to really dedicate yourself to your craft.”

    ADVICE FOR THE YOUNG MUSICIAN:

    Carol Kaye’s advice for the young musician is to be wary of the music education that you are receiving. “People were playing tunes with a LOT of chords in them until Rock and Roll came along which don’t have a lot of chords. Today ex-rockers are teaching music and they don’t know their chordal theory at all, and so music education is suffering badly because they’re all teaching note-scales – music functions with chords, not note- scales…there’s a huge gap in good music education these days… be sure to study chords, chordal notes, chordal progressions, that’s the only way to play and write good music. Music has always had good chords and education today is lacking because of the lack of fine teachers like there used to be”

    LOOKING FOR MORE INFORMATION?

    If you are interested in reading more about the Carol Kaye’s career and her successes, you can visit her website. If you are a bass player and even if you aren’t, I personally recommend checking out her Playing tips page.

    December 5, 2012 • Interviews • Views: 1272