Repair Tips
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  • Instrument Repair Etiquette

    This article is part of a series of repair articles written Rheuben Allen.

    Taking your instrument into a repair person is comparable to visiting a doctor. Your instrument, like your body, needs regular check-ups and telling the doctor (or repair person) any symptoms you (your instrument) may have will help with diagnosis.

    So, make sure you talk to your repair person! They are unable to guess your problems and if you don’t tell them about the issues you’re having, they can’t help you diagnose or repair them. If you are having trouble in the lower register, tell him or her. If you cannot play a harmonic G on your tenor, tell him or her.

    When looking at your instrument, on the other hand, they may discover problems you were unaware of and miss something that made it difficult to play. But to ensure that your horn gets the best attention, point out anything you think may be wrong.

    It is important to have a good relationship with your repairman or woman, and the basis of a good relationship is communication.

    There are two things to look for when choosing a repair person. The first is obviously his or her ability as a repair person, and the second is whether or not you can get along with him or her. If they will not talk to you or listen to your needs, find another. Be sure to check with other musicians for references.

    This article has been taken with permission from Rheuben Allen‘s website.

    August 30, 2012 • Repair Tips • Views: 941

  • Basic Saxophone Repair

    This article is part of a series of repair articles written Rheuben Allen.

    Here are a few tips for basic saxophone repair.

    Removing the Bounce in Your Low C Key:

    In order to remove the bounce in the low C key of a saxophone, you must first move the spring out from under the arm of the key. Next, cut a small slot in the key. Make sure that the slot is not too deep. Adjust the spring and place it in the slot. This changes the pivot point of the spring and does not allow the key to bounce as much.

    Fixing Sticky Saxophone Keys:

    The G# and the low C# keys on the saxophone have a tendency to stick. The reason that the G# and C# keys stick is because the pad is closed against the tone hole, and so, whenever someone drinks anything other than water or eats before they play, they are contributing to the build-up on the pad that causes the key to stick.

    There are several ways to prevent sticky keys. Here are five ways to help prevent your keys from sticking:

    1. Place a thin piece of plastic sandwich wrap between the pad and tone hole so that the seat of the pad will not change when it dries. (After you are done playing)
    2. Have the spring tension adjusted so that it is as strong as possible without making the G# or C# difficult to finger.
    3. Change the direction of the spring. Leverage is very important to the operation of the G#.
    4. Replace the blue steel spring with a stainless steel spring. The stainless steel spring works differently than the blue steel and seems to have more tension.
    5. Brush your teeth and tongue before playing your instrument.

    This article has been taken with permission from Rheuben Allen‘s website.

    August 30, 2012 • Repair Tips • Views: 1097